Viloma Pranayama Breathing Practice

Viloma Pranayama is a breathing practice. Viloma: Vi (against) and Loma (hair);  meaning against the flow. Pranayama: Prana (life force) and Yama (control); meaning to control the breath. In Viloma Pranayama the inhalations and exhalations are interrupted with controlled pauses.

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Ujjayi Pranayama

Ujjayi Pranayama, victorious breath, breath with sound. Is a slow diaphragmatic breathing practice, which first fills the lower belly (where most of the capillaries are to feed the body with oxygen), then rises to the lower rib cage , and finally moves into the upper chest and throat, similar to the Three Part Breath practice.

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Kapalabhati Pranayama

Kapalabhati (kah-pah-lah-bah-tee); is a highly energizing and powerful abdominal breathing exercise that cleanses the respiratory system, effecting all parts of the respiratory system. Also good for the digestive system, abdominal muscles, expelling and purging the system of tension and negativity, cleansing the mind.

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The Breath

Ok, so I know you can breathe, otherwise you wouldn’t be reading this blog. Breathing happens naturally and adapts to whatever situation your in. Whether we get scared in a job interview or we are at the edge of the seat, nail biter, at the end of a game. For instance last weekend my nephew Nick made it to the Elk’s district foul shooting competition. There was a three way tie that resulted in a shootout. Nick’s first three shots, out of five, hit the rim and dropped in. The fourth shot, hit the rim, rolled around it, with the balls center of gravity to the outside. So in our minds there was no way it was going to fall in. As we watched holding our breath the ball drops through the net. His fifth shot was nothing but net. With Nick’s amazing, entertaining, breath stopping, performance he has advanced to the state shoot out.

So whats the big deal, right?

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Over-breathing

When you over-breath the tendency is to hyperventilate. Hyperventilation: “Excessive rate and depth of respiration leading to abnormal loss of carbon dioxide from blood”, Merriam-Webster. A normal breath is 12 bpm for men and 14 bpm for women. If you are asthmatic your breath might be two times the normal rate.

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